Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

  1. How much do your DireWolf Dogs cost?
  2. Do DireWolf Dogs have wolf in them?
  3. What is the process for purchasing a puppy?
  4. Do DireWolf Dogs get along with children, cats, and other pets?
  5. Do DireWolf Dogs shed?
  6. Are DireWolf Dogs hypoallergenic?
  7. How big are DireWolf Dogs?
  8. Do DireWolf Dogs make good therapy dogs?
  9. Do DireWolf Dogs make good service dogs?
  10. Do DireWolf Dogs bark, dig, whine, and howl?
  11. How trainable are DireWolf Dogs?

 

 

How much do your DireWolf Dogs cost?

We price our puppies based on their closeness to our standards, so pricing can vary a great deal depending on what each individual puppy shows us in potential in health, temperament and conformation. Each puppy is individually assessed because we take great care in choosing puppies that will be chosen to go on in our breeding program. 

For this reason, there are three categories of pricing for a DireWolf Dog: 

  1. Pet quality puppies: DireWolf Dogs that are pet quality generally cost between $2500 to $3000. This is our general policy, although if we have an outcross litter planned where we may see some wildly different temperament scores largely outside our standards, prices may drop drastically as a result. We have been known to price puppies at around $1500 if they are quite different from our ideals in temperament and or conformation. (Health is always guaranteed) 
  2. Breeding quality puppies: If we have an exceptional tempered dog or a dog that looks exceptionally wolfie with large bones and overall size, the price will rise above our general range. You can see puppies in this category ranging in price from $3000 to $6000, depending on how much it would pain us to sell them and lose their potential contribution to the breed. 
  3. Not for sale puppies: Puppies that are not for sale because they are going to remain in the Dire Wolf Project for breeding will state a price on their respective pages, but this price only reflects what we would consider selling them at IF they were for sale. The price will be outrageous and maybe even offensive to some, but just remember that we do NOT want to sell this puppy, so it would take a lot of money to get us to change our minds. The following may be reasons for deciding that a puppy is in this category. 

a. Sometimes we know a puppy has a particular desired genetic makeup to move the breed forward toward our ideals, even though it may not show up or be readily seen in this particular puppy itself.

b. Sometimes a puppy is far and away exceptional in temperament and/or conformation and has the desired traits we need and cannot lose.

c. Sometimes we only use a dam or sire one time and must retain a puppy from that particular line in order to continue the line. 

d. Sometimes a highly coveted and/or rare genetic trait is seen in a particular pup that we want to perpetuate in the breed and will lose if we sold the pup. 

 

 

Do DireWolf Dogs have wolf in them?

No. We have not, nor will we ever, breed in any recent wolf content at any time. This includes any of the following wolfdog breeds (or wolf look-a-like breeds with unknown ancestry): 

  1. Czecheslovakian Vicak 
  2. Saarloos Wolfdog
  3. American Tundra Shepherd Dog
  4. Northern Inuit
  5. Utonogan
  6. Tamaskan Dog (or any registry)
  7. Alaskan Noble Companion Dog
  8. Native American Indian Dog


The following breeds have contributed their genes to the American Alsatian: 

  1. German Shepherd Dog
  2. Alaskan Malamute
  3. English Mastiff
  4. Labrador Retriever
  5. Golden Retriever
  6. Akita
  7. Great Pyrenees
  8. Anatolian Shepherd Dog
  9. Irish Wolfhound
  10. Samoyed

 

 

What is the process of purchasing a puppy?

The process is completely spelled out on "Buying a DireWolf Dog" page, but briefly you will need to complete our puppy adoption questionnaire, become approved, and place a non-refundable $600 deposit in order to get on our waiting list. Once you are on our waiting list, you must let us know when a litter is officially confirmed that you are interested in a puppy from certain litter. We will then star your name on our waiting list to activate your status to "active." We will then personally contact each active waiting family going down the starred list in deposit order. When you receive a contact from us, then it is your time to choose your puppy. Once you choose your puppy, we will send you a completed Puppy Adoption Contract and Warranty. When we both sign the contract, you are free to send the rest of the money for your puppy. After your payment clears, you have just purchased your new puppy. We will work together to get your puppy home to you. 

 

 

Do DireWolf Dogs get along with children, cats and other pets?

Yes. DireWolf Dogs are very sweet-natured and gentle. Many of our dogs have best cat friends and grow up with children. 

 

Do DireWolf Dogs shed?

Yes, DireWolf Dogs constantly shed all throughout the year. You will find hairballs and fuzz all around your house. You can eliminate much of this by consistently brushing and grooming them. In addition to frequent "soft" shedding, American Alsatians also "blow" their coat twice a year when the weather begins to turn. This is a time when their entire fluffy undercoat is completely released and "blows" off of their body in huge chunks of cottony fur. It will be important to brush out this undercoat during these times so that you can manage the excessive shedding when this occurs. 

 

 

Are DireWolf Dogs hypoallergenic?

No. Our dogs are not specifically bred to be hypoallergenic. They have hair, dander, saliva and urine, which all cause allergens in those people who are allergic to dogs. Also, DireWolf Dogs have medium length coats that can collect pollen and dust which can also cause allergy symptoms. 

 

 

How big are DireWolf Dogs?

DireWolf Dogs generally range in size from 25 inches to 31 inches in height and weigh between 85 to 130 pounds. We are working to exactly replicate the bone and body structure of the extinct prehistoric Dire Wolf, the largest wolf to ever have roamed our planet. Dire Wolves stood on average 30 to 31 inches tall and weighed 130 to 150 pounds. We are not consistently producing these exact measurements, but it is important for you to know that we are actively working toward them. 

 

 

Do DireWolf Dogs make good therapy dogs?

DireWolf Dogs are bred specifically for a unique large breed companion dog temperament and are NOT working dogs. The temperament we select for is highly detailed and we temperament test each puppy three times before it goes to its new home. We know the specifics of each puppy's temperament and can match them very well to their new families. That being said, one of the temperament traits we specifically breed toward is a dog that is aloof and not overly friendly toward strangers. They happily accept stranger touch and affection, but they distinquish a stranger from their owners by giving most of their affection and acceptance to their family. A good therapy dog is one that loves the affection of others they do not know well. This is contrary to the ideal American Alsatian temperament. Most American Alsatians enjoy being with their family more than being with strangers and so are not good therapy dog candidates for this reason. However, DireWolf Dogs are very calm and gently accepting of strangers and may be able to greet others with a calmness and sweetness that is not seen by an overly affectionate, more outgoing dog, especially if you are working together in a place where the dog should not be rowdy or excitable due to their energetic enthusiasm to work.  In some therapy dog situations, you may find a DireWolf Dog may do well. You will need to let me know if that is what you want in your next dog so that I can steer you to the puppy that fits with your needs.

 

 

Do DireWolf Dogs make good service dogs?

DireWolf Dogs are bred specifically for a unique large breed companion dog temperament and are NOT working dogs. The temperament we select for is highly detailed and we temperament test each puppy three times before it goes to its new home. We know the specifics of each puppy's temperament and can match them very well to their new families. Due to years of selective breeding for just this unique companion temperament, DireWolf Dogs are highly devoted to their families and many possess an uncanny ability to "read" the emotions and state of health of their humans. Because they are bred specifically for calmness and alert intelligence, many forms of service dog work can be appropriate for a DireWolf Dog. That being said, American Alsatians have limitations. They are not energetic working type dogs and should not be expected to perform behaviors that other working breeds perform; such as retrieving, pulling wheelchairs, jumping up and down to alert, picking up objects, or barking constantly to alert. DireWolf Dogs are more innately able to do quiet, calm activities, such as alerting by lying down or sitting, leading a person out of a store or away from danger, lifting a paw to gently touch for alert, etc. Many do, however, excel at public access work because they easily ignore distractions as they tend to focus on their handler above all else. 

 

 

Do DireWolf Dogs bark, dig, whine, and howl?

DireWolf Dogs do not have a tendency to bark, whine, dig or howl constantly and for indiscriminate reasons. They can and will bark once or twice to alert that someone coming to the door or at the raccoon sneaking into the outside garbage, but they do not constantly bark for no reason. DireWolf Dogs do not whine. Digging is at a minimum, although it can occur if they are bored or hormonal (if not spayed/neutered). A pack of DireWolf Dogs may howl on rare occasion, but unless you train for it, your DireWolf Dog does not howl. 

 

 

How trainable are DireWolf Dogs?

DireWolf Dogs are exceptionally smart and easy to train. That is one of the aspects toward which we specifically breed. They learn new activities quickly. However, they typically do not enjoy treats shoved at them. Somehow, we have noticed that many, many American Alsatians get bored with treats, even high-value rewards. Unless you keep them slightly hungry, this is usually not the best reward for training an American Alsatian. They prefer a reward of quality time spent with their people. This may include soft play, brushing, grooming, snuggling, petting, and generally seeing that their human is pleased with them.